How to Disable or Enable “Shut Down Event Tracker” (Reason UI) Feature in Windows Server and Client OS?

NOTE: The same procedure mentioned below can also be used to enable "Shut Down Event Tracker" (Shut Down Reason UI) in Windows XP and later.

If you are using Windows Server 2003 or later, you might have noticed that whenever you click on Shutdown button, it shows a dialog box asking you the reason behind shutting down the system. You have to select an option from drop-down box or write into Comment box to be able to shutdown the system.

Many people find it very annoying and want to disable it but they don't know how to disable it.

Today in this tutorial, we'll tell you a simple way to completely remove this annoying dialog box:

METHOD 1: Using Group Policy Editor

1. Type gpedit.msc in RUN dialog box and press Enter.

2. It'll open Group Policy Editor. Now go to:

Computer Configuration -> Administrative Templates -> System

3. In right-side pane, look for "Display Shutdown Event Tracker" option.

4. Now double-click on "Display Shutdown Event Tracker" and select "Disabled". Apply it and the annoying dialog box will never appear again.

NOTE: You can also use this method to enable Shutdown Event Tracker in Windows client OS like Windows XP and later. Just set the option value to "Enabled".

METHOD 2: Using Registry Editor

If you face problems while using Group Policy Editor, you can also use Registry Editor to do the same task.

1. Type regedit in RUN dialog box and press Enter.

2. It'll open Registry Editor. Now go to following key:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows NT\Reliability
OR
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Reliability

3. Now select "Reliability" key and in right-side pane, look for following 2 DWORD values:

ShutdownReasonOn
ShutdownReasonUI

If the DWORD values are not present, create them.

4. Now set values of both DWORD to 0 to disable "Shut Down Event Tracker" in Windows Server 2003 and later. You can set its value to 1 to do the opposite, i.e. to enable "Shut Down Event Tracker" in Windows XP and later.

5. That's it. Now you'll not see the reason dialog box while shutting down the system.

Thanks to our readers "Config" and "Dragonsbane777" for sharing registry method...





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Posted in: Troubleshooting, Windows 7, Windows Vista, Windows XP


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Comments

  • I am trying to use the event tracker functionality on a large group of XP SP3 machines. According to the articles I have read, the service should work the same as it does on the server platforms. Prompting on user initiated shutdown via the UI and also on boot following unexpected events.

    I am able to get the system to prompt when I have initiated the shutdown or restart via the UI.

    I have not been able to get the prompt to be displayed following power loss or other reset conditions.

    Can anyone offer a solution?

    Please advise.

    Thanks!

  • VG

    ^^ The dialog box can only be shown when you are selecting a power option manually. You cant initiate it for improper shutdown conditions.

  • It would be nice if the MS documentation said that. All of the articles I have read related to XP usage of the event tracker indicate that it functions exactly like that of the server products. Oh well. I will need to find another solution.

    Maybe you could suggest an alternative approach to the following problem?: I support a large group of XP based business systems. Our user base has a tendency to cycle the power in an attempt to remedy issues rather than request help from our helpdesk staff, etc. Only later do we find that the machines have been rebooted several times when we review our weekly reboot reports. I was intending to force the user to give some sort of input upon reboot/shutdown. Can you think of an other way to force the user to do this?

    Thanks!

  • VG

    ^^ Please check the updated tutorial above. I have added another key location, try that.

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